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STATE OF THE ARTS: Salidas y Entradas | Exits and Entrances

In the work of artists Jessica Hankey and Erin Johnson, theatricality is a means of enlarging the self and creating new realities. In their multi-channel video installation Salidas y Entradas | Exits and Entrances, participants from three of El Paso’s senior centers explore the boundaries between rehearsal, improvisation, performance, and critique.

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-ORIGINALLY AIRED SEPTEMBER 17, 2017-

Hector A. Garcia is a psychologist with the Valley Coastal Bend Veterans Health Care System. In his work as a researcher, Garcia examines barriers to PTSD care, masculine identity and its impact on PTSD treatment-seeking, and how occupational burnout impacts PTSD care providers, who daily hear detailed accounts of trauma. This week, our discussion with Mr. Garcia enlightens us on the history of P.T.S.D. and the treatments that have been discovered to be very useful in treating our veterans and other affected individuals.

-ORIGINALLY AIRED OCTOBER 15, 2017- 

Author José Antonio Rodríguez is well known for his extensive work in poetry. However, on this edition of Words on a Wire, we venture away from the poetry and delve into his newest (and first) memoir titled House Built on Ashes.

-ORIGINALLY AIRED MAY 27, 2017-

The summer season is upon us, which means hotter temperatures and plenty of sunshine. This week, we revisit our conversation with dermatologist Dr. Karen Herman as she shares tips on proper sun protection, that can be practiced not just during certain seasons, but year-round. 

In Mexican lucha libre there is a subset of wrestlers known as exóticos who compete in drag. It just so happens that one of the most prolific exoticos, Cassandro, was born and raised in Cd. Juarez, and currently makes El Paso his home.

He also happens to be the first exótico to win a world title. Today, we are dedicating our entire show to getting to know our homegrown exiotico, Cassandro.

Part 2 of our interview with lucha libre exotico Cassandro.

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Let's not bury the lede: The Two-Way will no longer be updating with the latest breaking news from NPR. Our work is not stopping, but it is relocating.

NPR is shifting how stories are presented online, removing a number of blogs and organizing those stories by topic instead.

That means this page — the Two-Way homepage — will no longer update. However, the reporters and editors are sticking around, and all our stories, on the same wide range of subjects, will continue to be on NPR.org.

Here's how to find us:

Kennedy Center President Deborah Rutter told reporters Tuesday that the spirit of President John F. Kennedy informs just about everything the Center does, including its new expansion called The REACH.

The REACH "came about from President Kennedy's aspirational, ever-hopeful vision for our nation," said Rutter, at a "first look" tour of the site. "He encouraged us to reach for dreams, for those moonshot moments that would move us forward."

Updated at 3 a.m. ET

The California judge who prompted a national outcry after handing former Stanford University swimmer Brock Turner a six-month sentence for sexual assault has been recalled by voters in Santa Clara County.

With 43 percent of county precincts reporting, 59 percent of voters favored the recall of Superior Court Judge Aaron Persky, 41 percent opposed the recall, according to The Associated Press, who called the vote early Wednesday.

After President Trump cast aspersions on the Super Bowl champion Philadelphia Eagles and disinvited them from a White House celebration, the fallout has been wide-ranging and swift — from Philadelphia's mayor questioning Trump's patriotism to Fox News apologizing for implying Eagles players had taken a knee during the national anthem.

The acrimony continued Tuesday, when the White House said "the vast majority of the Eagles team decided to abandon their fans."

Disgraced movie producer Harvey Weinstein appeared in a New York City courtroom Tuesday and pleaded not guilty to two counts of rape and one count of a criminal sex act, less than a week after a grand jury indicted him.

Weinstein, 66, had been expected to plead not guilty and remains free on bail.

Dozens of women have come forward to accuse Weinstein of persistent sexual misconduct.

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A senior FBI official who has come under fire for sending politically charged text messages while working on the Hillary Clinton email investigation and the Trump-Russia probe has been escorted out of the FBI building.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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White House deputy chief of staff Joe Hagin, who played a key role in organizing President Trump's Singapore summit with Kim Jong Un, is retiring.

The White House said Hagin will step down after serving in every GOP administration since Ronald Reagan's. His departure is expected next month.

Hagin led the U.S. team that managed logistics for last week's Trump-Kim meeting, winning praise from the president.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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When the Dow Jones Industrial Average was created more than 120 years ago, it included 12 companies. Nearly all of the names faded away long ago: United States Leather Company, Distilling & Cattle Feeding Co., Chicago Gas Light And Coke Company.

All but one: General Electric, which on Friday was finally dropped from the now 30-company Industrial Average in favor of the parent company of the Walgreens chain of pharmacies.

The order came in April. China's government instructed farmers in the country's northeastern breadbasket region to grow more soybeans, calling it "a political priority."

But soybean fields lay empty in the village of Sandaogou, which means "Three Ditches," in Liaoning province. It has been a dry spring.

"We've had a drought this year, so we planted soybeans late. The seedlings should be out by now. We need more rain," says farmer Liu, who only gives her surname for fear of trouble with local authorities. Soy, after all, has become "political."

Former Mexico President and longtime advocate for the legalization of marijuana, Vicente Fox, has joined the board of directors of High Times, the company announced Monday.

The addition of the ex-global leader comes as the company is planning to go public on the Nasdaq.

President Trump told a group of small-business owners Tuesday that the nation's economic future has never looked brighter. But that future could be imperiled by Trump's own multifront trade war.

"Main Street is thriving and America is winning once again," Trump declared in a speech to the NFIB, a small-business lobbying group. "You know, we're respected again. This country is respected again."

The president touted surveys showing near-record business confidence, along with solid job gains and an expected rebound in economic growth.

Big banks are skirting the rules on the sale of the complex financial instruments that helped bring about the 2008 financial crisis, by exploiting a loophole in federal banking regulations, a new report says.

The loophole could leave Wall Street exposed to big losses, potentially requiring taxpayers to once again bail out the biggest banks, warns the report's author, Michael Greenberger, former director of trading and markets at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission.

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On the morning I read Jim Crace's superb new novel The Melody, I was in our living room when I heard them: bells. Chiming over and over again, from I knew not where. It felt as if the book itself had created an atmosphere around me, as if I'd entered its world involuntarily — and I wasn't surprised.

PJ Morton, the keyboardist for Maroon Five, has a lot to say. At a moment when music and pop culture have become hyper-politicized, Morton has released a solo album. He says he wants it to do what other artists’ songs did during the civil rights era, and help push a movement forward.

You can hear an unplugged version of Morton’s new album here:

How does Morton work as both an artist and entrepreneur?

Here's the thing about There There, the debut novel by Native American author Tommy Orange: Even if the rest of its story were just so-so — and it's much more than that — the novel's prologue would make this book worth reading.

In 1841, small-town parish clerk William Hinton got his first look at an English locomotive in action. Writer Julian Young recorded Hinton's breathless reaction: "Well Sir, that was a sight to have seen; but one I never care to see again! How awful! I tremble to think of it! I don't know what to compare it to, unless it be to a messenger ... with a commission to spread desolation and destruction over this fair land! How much longer shall knowledge be allowed to go on increasing?"

Ken Jennings — yep, you got it: affable Jeopardy! champ/trivia doyen/comedy-adjacent media personality, that Ken Jennings — is worried.

Worried, not panicked. Not even distressed, really. No, what his book Planet Funny: How Comedy Took Over our Culture amounts to, really, is an extended, engaging, deeply knowledgeable, 275-page-long (312, if you count the endnotes) (come on, you knew there'd be endnotes) fret.

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Scientists have uncovered a pit of human bones at a Civil War battlefield in Virginia. The remains are the amputated limbs of wounded Union soldiers.

It's the first "limb pit" from a Civil War battlefield to be excavated, and experts say it opens a new window on what is often overlooked in Civil War history: the aftermath of battle, the agony of survivors and the trials of early combat surgeons.

When the Dow Jones Industrial Average was created more than 120 years ago, it included 12 companies. Nearly all of the names faded away long ago: United States Leather Company, Distilling & Cattle Feeding Co., Chicago Gas Light And Coke Company.

All but one: General Electric, which on Friday was finally dropped from the now 30-company Industrial Average in favor of the parent company of the Walgreens chain of pharmacies.

The order came in April. China's government instructed farmers in the country's northeastern breadbasket region to grow more soybeans, calling it "a political priority."

But soybean fields lay empty in the village of Sandaogou, which means "Three Ditches," in Liaoning province. It has been a dry spring.

"We've had a drought this year, so we planted soybeans late. The seedlings should be out by now. We need more rain," says farmer Liu, who only gives her surname for fear of trouble with local authorities. Soy, after all, has become "political."

Former Mexico President and longtime advocate for the legalization of marijuana, Vicente Fox, has joined the board of directors of High Times, the company announced Monday.

The addition of the ex-global leader comes as the company is planning to go public on the Nasdaq.

Sometimes it takes an outsider to notice that something that seems commonplace is actually spectacular.

That's what happened at the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary in the Gulf of Mexico, when Josh Stewart took his first dive into the protected waters and identified what has now become the first recognized nursery ground for giant oceanic manta rays.

A recording of migrant children crying for their mothers and fathers has gripped the nation — and ratcheted up the debate over the Trump administration's policy of separating families at the border.

In a video posted to Twitter Monday, the president of France tore into a teenager who called him 'Manu,' a common nickname for Emmanuel in French, during an event at a World War II memorial.

Instead of shaking the boy's hand, or taking a selfie — as he did with other crowd members, Macron proceeded to reprimand him.

"Call me 'M. President of the Republic' or 'Sir'," Macron said in the video.

He also tweeted his disapproval citing the boy's lack of respect.

A senior FBI official who has come under fire for sending politically charged text messages while working on the Hillary Clinton email investigation and the Trump-Russia probe has been escorted out of the FBI building.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

White House deputy chief of staff Joe Hagin, who played a key role in organizing President Trump's Singapore summit with Kim Jong Un, is retiring.

The White House said Hagin will step down after serving in every GOP administration since Ronald Reagan's. His departure is expected next month.

Hagin led the U.S. team that managed logistics for last week's Trump-Kim meeting, winning praise from the president.

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