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STATE OF THE ARTS: The Tumbleweed Collective

The Tumbleweed Collective Presents RE-: Stories of the Borderland a dance performance that explores the REality of living on the cusp of two nations. "RE-" targets present issues and reflects on the importance of the bi-national land where we coexist, the multicultural RElationships which forge "hermanidad" and how we overcome challenges unique to this area.

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***Originally Aired January 3, 2016*** 

Jon Chorover is Professor and Department Head at the Department of Soil, Water, and Environmental Science at the University of Arizona. 

Annabelle Gurwitch is an actress and the author of Wherever You Go, There They Are. She is a New York Times best seller and a Thurber Prize finalist. She’s written for the New Yorker, the New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, and The Hollywood Reporter

Joseph Finder is a New York Times bestselling author of fourteen suspense novels, including his latest novel "The Switch". Two of Finder's novels have been adapted into major motion pictures. 

  

  ***Orginal Broadcast Date: Janurary 18, 2015***

 Daniel & Tim talk with poet Soul Vang, whose latest collection "To Live Here" is a collection of poems that unfolds as a memoir.  The book tells of the Hmong experience in the US, and of Soul's experiences as a Hmong writer in Fresno CA and a US Army veteran.  Soul is also a founder of the Hmong American Writers Circle http://hmongwriters.org/

For this week's Poem of the Week, Soul Vang reads "Chino" from his collection, "To Live Here."

The Tumbleweed Collective Presents RE-: Stories of the Borderland a dance performance that explores the REality of living on the cusp of two nations.

"RE-" targets present issues and reflects on the importance of the bi-national land where we coexist, the multicultural RElationships which forge "hermanidad" and how we overcome challenges unique to this area.

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Passengers at Boston's Logan International Airport were surfing their phones and drinking coffee, waiting to board a flight to Aruba recently when a JetBlue agent came on the loudspeaker, announcing: "Today, we do have a unique way of boarding."

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In Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, Titus Andromedon is a show-stealing character. Tituss Burgess plays the mostly out-of-work actor who's black, gay and an endearing friend to the very naive Kimmy Schmidt.

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