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STATE OF THE ARTS: Reel Authentico Video Contest

The Downtown Management District is looking for a few good local filmmakers. The Reel Authentico Video Contest is asking entrants to produce a video that captures the spirit of ‘Authentico’ in Downtown El Paso. Winners will be highlighted in an Insider feature article, have their video distributed on the official Downtown El Paso YouTube channel, and will have their videos presented at the Plaza Classic Film Festival. Here to tell us all about it is Rudy Vasquez from the El Paso Downtown Management District.

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NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter

***Originally Aired Feb. 7, 2016***  

Dr. Jim Murphy, Associate Professor in New Mexico State University's Astronomy Department will give us a primer on Mars.  What is the composition of the Martian atmosphere, and how do scientists determine that information?  Martian weather has many similarities with Earth's weather: seasons, dust storms, and weather systems.  The Martian day is also very similar to Earth's 24-hour cycle.

Aired July 16, 2017

***Originally Broadcast on May 22, 2016***

Kate Schatz is a writer, educator, and feminist, and she joins us on this program to tell us about "Rad American Women A-Z," an alphabet book for children and for everyone.  Women of color and lesser-known revolutionary scientists, musicians, and activists are highlighted in the book, including Rachel Carson, Odetta, and Angela Davis.   http://radamericanwomen.com/

Aired July 16, 2017

Lxs Dos: Pásele, Pásele presents the work of husband and wife duo Christian and Ramon Cardenas who together form the artist collaborative Lxs Dos. Their dynamic, character-driven artwork can be seen in public spaces throughout the sister cities of El Paso and Juarez.

The artists have a close connection to the border and a commitment to creating visual tributes to sometimes invisible aspects of border life – street vendors and immigrants, graffiti, posters and traditional sign-making, musicians and youth culture. You can see Pasele, Pasele at the Rubin center until September 29th, 2017.

The Downtown Management District is looking for a few good local filmmakers. The Reel Authentico Video Contest is asking entrants to produce a video that captures the spirit of ‘Authentico’ in Downtown El Paso.

Winners will be highlighted in an Insider feature article, have their video distributed on the official Downtown El Paso YouTube channel, and will have their videos presented at the Plaza Classic Film Festival.

Here to tell us all about it is Rudy Vasquez from the El Paso Downtown Management District.

It's the 21st century and while we may not have the flying cars that were predicted in earlier years the year 2017 has seen a surge in virtual reality. From games to home assistants virtual reality is becoming a part of our daily lives. The Interactive Systems Group (ISG) at UTEP is a team of dedicated professors, graduate and undergrad students who study, develop, and investigate these interactive systems.

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Hosted by award-winning journalist David Brown, Texas Standard explores the world of news, economics, innovation and culture, every day — from a Texas perspective.

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The rise of artificial intelligence poses its fair share of dangers. Last year, for instance, physicist Stephen Hawking said its development could be "either the best or the worst thing ever to happen to humanity." And just this weekend, Tesla CEO Elon Musk described AI as a potential "existential threat" to human civilization.

Dogs are cute. Baby deer are arguably even cuter. So what could be more heroic and life-affirming than a dog saving the life of a fawn?

Storm, an English golden retriever, was out for a walk Sunday morning along the Long Island Sound with fellow dog Sara and his owner, Mark Freeley.

Amid the lapping waves, a baby deer was in over its head out in the sound.

"Storm just plunged into the water and started swimming out to the fawn," Freeley told CBS New York.

Twice now, the murder and manslaughter case against a former University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing has ended in a mistrial over his fatal shooting of black motorist Sam DuBose.

Now, the Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters says that he will not try Tensing a third time, member station WVXU reports.

"I don't like it. We believe we cannot be successful at trial," Deters said, according to The Associated Press.

The city of Boston is launching a poster campaign to fight Islamophobia by encouraging bystanders to intervene, in a nonconfrontational way, if they witness anti-Muslim harassment.

Starting Monday, the city began installing 50 posters around the city with advice on what to do if you see Islamophobic behavior. The posters recommend sitting by a victim of harassment and talking with them about a neutral subject while ignoring the harasser.

A corruption probe into Pakistan's prime minister has taken a turn on a surprising forensic detail: the basic Microsoft font Calibri.

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In the age of the Internet, does simply livestreaming a government meeting make it "open to the public"?

That question is at the heart of a slew of lawsuits filed by rights groups who claim that President Trump's voter fraud commission — known officially as the Presidential Commission on Election Integrity but colloquially as the Pence-Kobach Commission — has failed to open its proceedings to the public.

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Investors sent shares of the Internet streaming service Netflix soaring after the company reported that it had beaten forecasts and attracted 5.2 million new subscribers worldwide, increasing its membership to 104 million.

"We also crossed the symbolic milestones of 100 million members and more international than domestic members. It was a good quarter," Netflix wrote in its second-quarter letter to shareholders.

Chipotle saw its stock dip Tuesday after it temporarily closed a Sterling, Va., restaurant where several people reported getting sick.

"That is an especially sensitive issue for Chipotle, which struggled with recurring problems with foodborne illness two years ago that caused its stock price to plummet," NPR's Yuki Noguchi told our Newscast unit. "Investors showed signs of nervousness again today, with the stock losing, at one point, more than 7.5 percent in value."

State legislatures and city halls are battling over who gets to set the minimum wage, and increasingly, the states are winning.

After dozens of city and county governments voted to raise their local minimum wage ordinances in the last several years, states have been responding by passing laws requiring cities to abide by statewide minimums. So far, 27 states have passed such laws.

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Londoners may feel hot this summer, but historian Rosemary Ashton says it's nothing compared to what the city endured in 1858. That was the year of "The Great Stink" — when the Thames River, hot and filled with sewage, made life miserable for the residents of the city.

"It was continuously hot for two to three months with temperatures up into the 90s quite often," Ashton says. "The hottest recorded day up to that point in history was the 16th of June, 1858, when the temperature reached 94.5 degrees Fahrenheit, in the shade."

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In August 2016, three months before the presidential election, Republican nominee Donald Trump was behind in the polls. Instead of staying on message, the candidate was engaged in a politically damaging fight with the parents of an Army captain killed in Iraq.

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art has some 34,000 works in its collection — but you'll only find a fraction of those up on the wall.

"A little under 2,000 of them are on view at any one time in the galleries," says Keir Winesmith, head of SFMOMA's Web and digital platforms.

So what to do with the rest?

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Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

In addition to a formal meeting between President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin at the Group of 20 summit in Hamburg, Germany, earlier this month, the two leaders held a separate, private conversation that has not been previously disclosed, a White House official confirmed on Tuesday.

On July 7, the two leaders held a formal two-hour meeting in which Trump later said that his Russian counterpart had denied any interference in the 2016 election.

Investors sent shares of the Internet streaming service Netflix soaring after the company reported that it had beaten forecasts and attracted 5.2 million new subscribers worldwide, increasing its membership to 104 million.

"We also crossed the symbolic milestones of 100 million members and more international than domestic members. It was a good quarter," Netflix wrote in its second-quarter letter to shareholders.

Chipotle saw its stock dip Tuesday after it temporarily closed a Sterling, Va., restaurant where several people reported getting sick.

"That is an especially sensitive issue for Chipotle, which struggled with recurring problems with foodborne illness two years ago that caused its stock price to plummet," NPR's Yuki Noguchi told our Newscast unit. "Investors showed signs of nervousness again today, with the stock losing, at one point, more than 7.5 percent in value."

Londoners may feel hot this summer, but historian Rosemary Ashton says it's nothing compared to what the city endured in 1858. That was the year of "The Great Stink" — when the Thames River, hot and filled with sewage, made life miserable for the residents of the city.

"It was continuously hot for two to three months with temperatures up into the 90s quite often," Ashton says. "The hottest recorded day up to that point in history was the 16th of June, 1858, when the temperature reached 94.5 degrees Fahrenheit, in the shade."

Why It's So Hard To Stop The World's Looming Famines

9 hours ago

It's the famine that not enough people have heard about.

An estimated 20 million people in four countries — Somalia, South Sudan, Nigeria and Yemen — are at risk of famine and starvation. And the word isn't getting out, says Justin Forsyth, a deputy executive director of UNICEF.

A woman in Saudi Arabia has been arrested after a short Snapchat video showed her wearing a skirt and crop top in the desert heat.

Her outfit would be unremarkable in the U.S., but it violated Saudi Arabia's strict, conservative dress code for women. The footage went viral online over the weekend.

On Tuesday, Saudi Arabian state TV announced via Twitter that the woman had been taken into custody by police and that the case had been referred to the general prosecutor.

A Soviet-born American businessman was the eighth person present at a June 2016 meeting that included President Trump's son, son-in-law, campaign manager and a Russian lawyer who allegedly had promised to provide dirt on Hillary Clinton.

State legislatures and city halls are battling over who gets to set the minimum wage, and increasingly, the states are winning.

After dozens of city and county governments voted to raise their local minimum wage ordinances in the last several years, states have been responding by passing laws requiring cities to abide by statewide minimums. So far, 27 states have passed such laws.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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