KTEP - El Paso, Texas

STATE OF THE ARTS: El Paso Children's Museum

Toronto, Canada native Paul Kortenaar is the founding executive director of the El Paso children’s museum. He’s tasked with overseeing the vision and construction of the museum, which once built, will be across the street from the El Paso Convention Center and ballpark in the heart of the El Paso Downtown Arts District.

Read More

Latest from KTEP

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded a grant of more than $2 million to UTEP and EPCC to establish The Humanities Collaborative. The goals of this three-year project are to expand collaboration in the humanities between the two institutions and to invigorate humanities coursework and student research at both institutions through paid internships, community involvement, interdisciplinary mentored research and other high-impact experiences. 

The Consulate General of Mexico presents “Raices Raramuris” a concert by raramuri musician Romayno Gutierrez at the Fox Fine Arts Recital Hall on Thursday, July 26 at 6pm.  This concert will be complimented by a photo exhibition by Heber Nickolath of his ethno-anthropological studies of Mexico and its indigenous people. 

Having a hard time selecting plants to fill in a shady area in your garden? This week, we share tips on how to keep your garden colorful and full during the summer season.

Mainstream movie reviewers and established film critics tend to skew older in age, and perhaps the lack of younger voices in cinema writing distorts consensus on popular movie titles. A new website hopes to harness the writing skills and discernment of college students to provide a new perspective on movies. This week, we spoke with Zac Powell and Hannah Mathes, students at the University of Texas at Austin, to discuss their newly launched site, HookedOnMovies.org. Powell and Mathes, along with a team of writers, hope this new outlet will connect young movie lovers nationwide and even encourage them to step out of their comfort zones when it comes to movie selection with the help of their peers.

Every summer, the University of Texas at El Paso selects a talented group of high school students who are interested in pursuing journalism as their professional career and are exposed to the day-to-day environment a multimedia journalist faces in the 21st century. Journalism in July is an intense journalism "boot camp" and here to tell us more about the program's activities, as well as the results students can expect within the one week workshop, is UTEP Multimedia Journalism professor, Dino Chiecchi. 

More from KTEP

Weekdays from 5am to 9am

Hosted by Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne and David Greene, Morning Edition takes listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries every weekday.

Weekdays from 9am to 10am

Hosted by award-winning journalist David Brown, Texas Standard explores the world of news, economics, innovation and culture, every day — from a Texas perspective.

Connect With Us

Latest from NPR

Let's not bury the lede: The Two-Way will no longer be updating with the latest breaking news from NPR. Our work is not stopping, but it is relocating.

NPR is shifting how stories are presented online, removing a number of blogs and organizing those stories by topic instead.

That means this page — the Two-Way homepage — will no longer update. However, the reporters and editors are sticking around, and all our stories, on the same wide range of subjects, will continue to be on NPR.org.

Here's how to find us:

Kennedy Center President Deborah Rutter told reporters Tuesday that the spirit of President John F. Kennedy informs just about everything the Center does, including its new expansion called The REACH.

The REACH "came about from President Kennedy's aspirational, ever-hopeful vision for our nation," said Rutter, at a "first look" tour of the site. "He encouraged us to reach for dreams, for those moonshot moments that would move us forward."

Updated at 3 a.m. ET

The California judge who prompted a national outcry after handing former Stanford University swimmer Brock Turner a six-month sentence for sexual assault has been recalled by voters in Santa Clara County.

With 43 percent of county precincts reporting, 59 percent of voters favored the recall of Superior Court Judge Aaron Persky, 41 percent opposed the recall, according to The Associated Press, who called the vote early Wednesday.

After President Trump cast aspersions on the Super Bowl champion Philadelphia Eagles and disinvited them from a White House celebration, the fallout has been wide-ranging and swift — from Philadelphia's mayor questioning Trump's patriotism to Fox News apologizing for implying Eagles players had taken a knee during the national anthem.

The acrimony continued Tuesday, when the White House said "the vast majority of the Eagles team decided to abandon their fans."

Disgraced movie producer Harvey Weinstein appeared in a New York City courtroom Tuesday and pleaded not guilty to two counts of rape and one count of a criminal sex act, less than a week after a grand jury indicted him.

Weinstein, 66, had been expected to plead not guilty and remains free on bail.

Dozens of women have come forward to accuse Weinstein of persistent sexual misconduct.

More News

NPR Politics

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Updated Saturday at 10:45 a.m. ET

This week in the Russia investigations: Six insights about the latest master blast from special counsel Robert Mueller.

The big one

As the noted counterintelligence analyst Kenny Loggins once said: "This is it."

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

President Trump sipped tea with the queen this afternoon at Windsor Castle. Even as the president and the first lady traded pleasantries with Britain's longest-reigning monarch, a very different story involving the administration was unfolding back in Washington.

More NPR Political Coverage

NPR Business News

Tariffs Hit Maine's Lobster Industry

7 hours ago

Copyright 2018 Maine Public. To see more, visit Maine Public.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Tech workers from Salesforce, Microsoft, Amazon and Google have been putting pressure on their CEOs to cut ties and end contracts with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, known as ICE, and other government agencies.

It's a rare occurrence for employees to tell their bosses to turn away business. But there is a growing concern among tech workers that the cutting-edge tools they create can be used in immoral ways.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

In the U.S., children under the age of 18 are legally barred from purchasing cigarettes or other tobacco products. But they are allowed to harvest tobacco on farms.

Despite a worldwide decline in production, tobacco remains North Carolina's most valuable crop. In 2017, the total value of tobacco produced in the state was just under $725 million, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross says he will sell all of the remaining stock he holds. He announced the move in a statement Thursday night after receiving a letter from the government's top ethics watchdog warning of the "potential for a serious criminal violation."

The letter was sent by David J. Apol, the Acting Director and General Counsel for the Office of Government Ethics. Apol faulted Ross for what he said were various omissions and inaccurate statements submitted to the OGE over the past year.

More NPR Business News

NPR Arts News

It's the summer of 2008, and Andrei Kaplan doesn't have a whole lot going for him in New York. Money's tight, his girlfriend dumped him, and, at 33, his academic career has stalled. So, at the urging of his brother, he returns to Russia, where he was born, to take care of his aging grandmother, Baba Seva.

In her first novel, Swallowing Geography, the English novelist and playwright Deborah Levy described a character becoming "many selves in order to survive. Through observation, study, and meditation she taught herself to change from one self to another, from one state to another." It's an early, tossed-off line, but it predicts Levy's whole body of work. Over and over, this is the story she tells: First a woman learns to change selves, and then she chooses, defiantly, to be the one self she likes best.

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

Darlene Love: From Background to Limelight

Jul 13, 2018

When the creators of the 2013 documentary 20 Feet From Stardom began envisioning a film focused on backup singers, one name kept coming up: Darlene Love. Among fans and musicians alike, Love had a sterling reputation as one of music's legendary, if still somewhat under-celebrated voices performing behind the biggest acts. So after speaking to Love, director Morgan Neville said he was finally convinced that he could make an entire movie on the topic, one that heavily showcased Love's long-winding career and countless behind-the-scenes stories.

More NPR Arts News

Angelique Kerber has won the Wimbledon women's singles title, beating Serena Williams 6-3, 6-3 in the final. She is the first German to win a Wimbledon singles title since Steffi Graf did so in 1996.

"This is one of the best moments of my career," Kerber told ESPN, saying that it has been her dream since childhood to win Wimbledon. She added that playing against Williams made the moment all the more significant: "Playing against Serena is always an honor for me."

Thousands of demonstrators took to the streets of Edinburgh and Glasgow on Saturday to protest against President Trump, who is spending the weekend in Scotland ahead of a meeting next week with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded a grant of more than $2 million to UTEP and EPCC to establish The Humanities Collaborative. The goals of this three-year project are to expand collaboration in the humanities between the two institutions and to invigorate humanities coursework and student research at both institutions through paid internships, community involvement, interdisciplinary mentored research and other high-impact experiences. 

The Consulate General of Mexico presents “Raices Raramuris” a concert by raramuri musician Romayno Gutierrez at the Fox Fine Arts Recital Hall on Thursday, July 26 at 6pm.  This concert will be complimented by a photo exhibition by Heber Nickolath of his ethno-anthropological studies of Mexico and its indigenous people. 

Having a hard time selecting plants to fill in a shady area in your garden? This week, we share tips on how to keep your garden colorful and full during the summer season.

Mainstream movie reviewers and established film critics tend to skew older in age, and perhaps the lack of younger voices in cinema writing distorts consensus on popular movie titles. A new website hopes to harness the writing skills and discernment of college students to provide a new perspective on movies. This week, we spoke with Zac Powell and Hannah Mathes, students at the University of Texas at Austin, to discuss their newly launched site, HookedOnMovies.org. Powell and Mathes, along with a team of writers, hope this new outlet will connect young movie lovers nationwide and even encourage them to step out of their comfort zones when it comes to movie selection with the help of their peers.

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

For decades, people living in Zimbabwe have been taught that speaking their minds comes at a cost. Under former president Robert Mugabe, an authoritarian ruler who held power for more than 37 years, openly challenging the government meant risking arrest, beating or worse. There's still a law on the books that makes insulting the president a crime.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Afghan Saffron Coming To U.S. Stores

7 hours ago

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Pages